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Bibliografická citace

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(1) Půjčeno:1x 
BK
2nd ed.
Chichester : John Wiley & Sons, c2005
xvii, 517 s. : il., mapy, grafy ; 26 cm

objednat
ISBN 0-470-87001-X (brož.)
Obsahuje bibliografie, bibliografické odkazy a rejstřík
000059508
Foreword ix Addendum x Preface xi // List of Acronyms and Abbreviations xv // Introduction i // 1 Systems, science, and study // 1.1 Introduction: why does GIS matter? 4 // 1.2 Data, information, evidence, knowledge, // wisdom 11 // 1.3 The science of problem solving 13 // 1.4 The technology of problem solving 16 // 1.5 The business of GIS 24 // 1.6 GISystems, GIScience, and GIStudies 28 // 1.7 GIS and geography 31 Questions for further study 33 Further reading 33 // 2 A gallery of applications 35 // 2.1 Introduction 36 // 2.2 Science, geography, and applications 39 // 2.3 Representative application areas and their // foundations 41 // 2.4 Concluding comments 60 Questions for further study 60 Further reading 60 // Principles 6i // 3 Representing geography 63 // 3.1 Introduction 64 // 3.2 Digital representation 65 // 3.3 Representation for what and for whom? 67 // 3.4 The fundamental problem 68 // 3.5 Discrete objects and continuous fields 70 // 3.6 Rasters and vectors 74 // 3.7 The paper map 76 // 3.8 Generalization 80 // 3.9 Conclusion 82 Questions for further study 83 Further reading 83 // 4 The nature of geographic data 85 // 4.1 Introduction 86 // 4.2 The fundamental problem revisited 86 // 4.3 Spatial autocorrelation and scale 87 // 4.4 Spatial sampling 90 // 4.5 Distance decay 93 // 4.6 Measuring distance effects as spatial // autocorrelation 95 // 4.7 Establishing dependence in space 101 // 4.8 Taming geographic monsters 104 // 4.9 Induction and deduction and how it all comes together 106 Questions for further study 107 Further reading 107 // 5 Georeferencing 109 // 5.1 Introduction 110 // 5.2 Placenames 112 // 5.3 Postal addresses and postal codes 113 // 5.4 Linear referencing systems 114 // 5.5 Cadasters and the US Public Land Survey // System 114 // 5.6 Measuring the Earth: latitude and longitude 115 // 5.7 Projections and coordinates 117 //
5.8 Measuring latitude, longitude, and elevation: GPS 122 // 5.9 Converting georeferences 123 // vi CONTENTS // 5.10 Summary 125 Questions for further study 126 Further reading 126 // 6 Uncertainty 127 // 6.1 Introduction 128 // 6.2 Ul: Uncertainty in the conception of // geographic phenomena 129 // 6.3 U2: Further uncertainty in the measurement // and representation of geographic phenomena 136 // 6.4 U3: Further uncertainty in the analysis of // geographic phenomena 144 // 6.5 Consolidation 152 Questions for further study 153 Further reading 153 // Techniques 155 // 7 GIS Software 157 // 7.1 Introduction 158 // 7.2 The evolution of GIS software 158 // 7.3 Architecture of GIS software 159 // 7.4 Building GIS software systems 165 // 7.5 GIS software vendors 165 // 7.6 Types of GIS software systems 167 // 7.7 GIS software usage 174 // 7.8 Conclusion 174 Questions for further study 174 Further reading 175 // 8 Geographic data modeling // 8.1 Introduction 178 // 8.2 GIS data models 179 // 8.3 Example of a water-facility object data model 192 // 8.4 Geographic data modeling in practice 195 Questions for further study 196 // Further reading 197 // 9 GIS data collection 199 // 9.1 Introduction 200 // 9.2 Primary geographic data capture 201 // 9.3 Secondary geographic data capture 205 // 9.4 Obtaining data from external sources (data transfer) 211 // 9.5 Capturing attribute data 215 // 9.6 Managing a data collection project 215 Questions for further study 216 // Further reading 216 // 10 Creating and maintaining geographic databases 217 // 10.1 Introduction 218 // 10.2 Database management systems 218 // 10.3 Storing data in DBMS tables 222 // 10.4 SQL 225 // 10.5 Geographic database types and // functions 226 // 10.6 Geographic database design 227 // 10.7 Structuring geographic information 229 // 10.8 Editing and data maintenance 235 //
10.9 Multi-user editing of continuous databases 235 // 10.10 Conclusion 237 Questions for further study 238 Further reading 239 // 11 Distributed GIS 241 // 11.1 Introduction 242 // 11.2 Distributing the data 244 // 11.3 The mobile user 250 // 11.4 Distributing the software: GIServices 257 // 11.5 Prospects 259 Questions for further study 259 Further reading 259 // Q| Analysis 261 // 12 Cartography and map production 263 // 12.1 Introduction 264 // 12.2 Maps and cartography 267 // 12.3 Principles of map design 270 // 12.4 Map series 281 // 12.5 Applications 284 // 12.6 Conclusions 287 Questions for further study 287 Further reading 287 // 13 Geovisualization 289 // 13.1 Introduction: uses, users, messages, and media 290 // 13.2 Geovisualization and spatial query 293 // 13.3 Geovisualization and transformation 297 // 13.4 Immersive interaction and PPGIS 302 // 13.5 Consolidation 309 Questions for further study 312 Further reading 313 // 14 Query, measurement, and transformation 315 // 14.1 Introduction: what is spatial analysis? 316 // 14.2 Queries 320 // 14.3 Measurements 323 // 14.4 Transformations 329 // 14.5 Conclusion 339 Questions for further study 339 Further reading 339 // 15 Descriptive summary, design, and inference 341 // 15.1 More spatial analysis 342 // 15.2 Descriptive summaries 343 // 15.3 Optimization 352 // 15.4 Hypothesis testing 359 // 15.5 Conclusion 361 Questions for further study 362 Further reading 362 // 16 Spatial modeling with GIS 363 // 16.1 Introduction 364 // 16.2 Types of model 369 // 16.3 Technology for modeling 376 // 16.4 Multicriteria methods 378 // 16.5 Accuracy and validity: testing the model 379 // 16.6 Conclusion 381 Questions for further study 381 Further reading 382 // Management and Policy // 17 Managing GIS 385 // 17.1 The big picture 386 // 17.2 The process of developing a sustainable GIS 390 //
17.3 Sustaining a GIS - the people and their competences 399 // 17.4 Conclusions 401 Questions for further study 402 Further reading 403 // 18 GIS and management, the Knowledge Economy, and information 405 // 18.1 Are we all in ‘managed businesses’ now? 406 // 18.2 Management is central to the successful use // of GIS 408 18.3 The Knowledge Economy, knowledge management, and GIS 413 // 18.4 Information, the currency of the Knowledge Economy 415 // 18.5 GIS as a business and as a business stimulant 422 // 18.6 Discussion 424 Questions for further study 424 Further reading 424 // 19 Exploiting GIS assets and navigating constraints 425 // 19.1 GIS and the law 426 // 19.2 GIS people and their skills 431 // 19.3 Availability of ‘core’ geographic information 434 // 19.4 Navigating the constraints 440 // 19.5 Conclusions 444 // Questions for further study 445 Further reading 445 // 20 GIS partnerships 447 // 20.1 Introduction 448 // 20.2 Collaborations at the local level 448 // 20.3 Working together at the national level 450 // 20.4 Multi-national collaborations 458 // 20.5 Nationalism, globalization, politics, and GIS 459 // 20.6 Extreme events can change everything 464 // 20.7 Conclusions 470 Questions for further study 470 Further reading 470 // 21 Epilog 471 // 21.1 Introduction 472 // 21.2 A consolidation of some recurring themes 472 // 21.3 Ten ‘grand challenges’ for GIS 478 // 21.4 Conclusions 485 Questions for further study 485 Further reading 486 // Index 487

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