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Bibliografická citace

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(26) Půjčeno:22x 
BK
7th ed.
Pacific Grove : Brooks/Cole, c2003
xxii,548 s. : il.

objednat
ISBN 0-534-60030-1 (váz.)
Obsahuje ilustrace, tabulky, seznam autorů, údaje o autorovi a jeho fotografii, úvod, resumé, dodatek, rejstřík
Bibliografie: s. 521-534
Práce sociální - učebnice
000081755
PART 1 // Introduction // 1 // CHAPTER 1 Overview of Social Work Practice 2 // The Purpose of This Chapter 2 The History of Social Work 2 A Definition of Social Work 4 The Relationship Between Social Work and Social Welfare 5 // What Is the Profession of Social Work? 5 Generalist Social Work Practice 5 The Change Process 7 A Variety of Roles 13 A Systems Perspective 15 // Counseling as a Component of Generalist Practice 15 The Medical Model versus the Ecological Model of Human Behavior 16 The Medical Model 16 The Ecological Model 18 Goals of Social Work Practice 19 Micro, Mezzo, and Macro Practice 21 Social Casework 21 Case Management 21 // Group Work 22 Group Therapy 22 Family Therapy 22 Community Organization 22 Policy Analysis 22 Administration 23 // The Knowledge, Skills, and Values Needed for Social Work Practice 23 Knowledge 23 Core Practice Skills 25 Values 27 // Goals of Social Work Education 28 Objectives of Social Work Education 28 A Greater Focus on Outcomes 29 Key Objectives 29 // Which Intervention Strategies Should Social Workers Learn? 30 Summary 31 Exercises 31 // CHAPTER Z Social Work Values 33 // Value Dilemmas 33 Knowledge and Values 35 Value Dilemmas of Clients versus Workers 35 Respect for the Dignity and Uniqueness of the Individual 37 // The Clients Right to Self-Determination 38 Confidentiality 40 // Privacy and Confidentiality in the Era of Modern Computer Technology 43 Privileged Communication 44 Explaining Confidentiality to Clients 45 // Ethical Dilemmas
About AIDS 46 Other Values 48 // The Institutional Orientation 48 Establishing Professional Boundaries with Clients 49 // Promoting Social and Economic Justice 51 Focus on Family 51 Accountability 52 Summary 52 Exercises 53 // part 2 // Social Work Practice // 57 // CHAPTER 3 Assessment 58 // The Strengths Perspective 59 Sources of Information 61 // The Clients Verbal Report 61 Assessment Forms 61 Computer-Assisted Assessment Forms 62 Collateral Sources 62 Psychological Tests 62 Nonverbal Behavior 62 Interactions with Significant Others and Home Visits 62 // Worker’s Conclusions from Direct Interactions 63 Knowledge Used in Making an Assessment 63 Environmental Systems Emphasis 65 Assessing Problems 65 A Systems Perspective: The // Pincus-Minahan Model 71 Summary 79 Exercises 80 // CHAPTEr4 Social Work with Individuals: Interviewing 82 // Three Types of Social Work Interviews 82 // Informational or Social History Interviews 82 Assessment Interviews 83 Therapeutic Interviews 83 The Place of the Interview 84 Opening the First Interview 86 When Interviewee-Initiated 86 When Interviewer-Initiated 86 // Closing an Interview 86 Questioning 87 Note Taking 88 // Tape Recording and Videotaping 90 Videotaping for Training Purposes 90 Summary 91 Exercise 93 // LUNIhNIb // ?? // CHAPTER 5 Social Work with Individuals: Counseling 94 // Counseling from the Workers Perspective 94 Counseling from the Clients Perspective 95 Stage I: Problem Awareness 95 Stage II: Relationship to Counselor 95
Stage III: Motivation 97 Stage IV: Conceptualizing the Problem 98 Stage V: Exploration of Resolution Strategies 101 Stage VI: Selection of a Strategy 101 Stage VII: Implementation 101 // Stage VIII: Evaluation 104 Clients’ Reactions to Having a Personal Problem 104 Kilbler-Rosss Five Stages of Dying 108 Kiibler-Ross’s Five Stages as Emotional Reactions 108 Summary 111 Exercises 112 // CHAPTER 6 Social Work with Groups: Types of Groups and // Guidelines for Leading Them 116 // Types of Groups 117 // Recreation Groups 111 Recreation-Skill Groups 117 Educational Groups 117 Task Groups 117 // Problem-Solving and Decision-Making Groups 117 // Focus Groups 123 // Self-Help Groups 123 // Socialization Groups 127 // Therapy Groups 127 // Encounter Groups 130 // How to Start, Lead, and Terminate Groups 132 Homework 132 // Session Planning 133 // Relaxing Before a Meeting 134 // Cues on Entering the Meeting Room 134 // Seating Arrangements 135 // Introductions 135 // Role Clarification 135 // Agenda 136 // Additional Guidelines for Leading a Group 136 Terminating a Group 136 Evaluating a Group 138 Summary 141 Exercises 141 // chapter 7 Social Work with Groups: Concepts and Skills 143 // Membership and Reference Groups 143 Group Development 144 // Garland, Jones, and Kolodny Model 144 Tuckman Model 145 Bales Model 145 Task and Maintenance Roles 146 Leadership Theory 147 The Trait Approach 147 The Position Approach 148 The Style Approach 149 The Distributed Functions Approach 149 // Sopiti in
??-??me- 1 // Idiosyncratic Credits 153 Competitive and Cooperative Groups 154 Controversy and Creativity 154 The Win-Lose Approach versus the Problem-Solving Approach 155 Strategies to Resolve Conflicts 157 Role Reversal 157 Empathy 157 Inquiry 157 I-Messages 157 Disarming 158 // Cj.._1.:_ ico // Starting, Leading, and Ending Therapy Groups Building Rapport 162 Exploring Problems in Depth 163 Exploring Alternative Solutions 164 // VI vj ? ?ii/p iö_> // 161 ??-Facilitating Groups 167 // Legal Safeguards for Group Facilitators 168 Summary 169 Exercises 170 // CHAPTER 8 Social Work with Families 174 // Diversity of Family Forms 174 Societal Functions of Families 176 Family Problems and the Nature of Social Work 177 Family Assessment 179 The Eco-Map 179 The Genogram 180 // Family Therapy in Systems Perspective 181 Four Approaches to Family Therapy 185 Virginia Satir 188 Salvador Minuchin 190 Jay Haley 192 // Ivan Boszormenyi-Nagi 193 Constructivist Approach—A Recent Trend 194 Problem-Solving Stages 195 // Beginning the Counseling Process 196 Continuing the Counseling Process 199 Restructuring the Family System 203 Maintenance of Gains and Termination of C ounse ling 207 Summary 207 Exercises 208 // CHAPTER 9 Social Work with Organizations 211 // Models of Organizational Behavior 212 The Autocratic Model 212 The Custodial Model 212 The Scientific Management Model 213 The Human Relations Model 213 Theory X and Theory Y 214 The Collegial Model 214 Theory Z 215* // Management by Objectives
215 // Total Quality Management 216 Summary Comments About Models of Organizational Behavior 217 Value Orientations in Organizational Decision Making 217 Liberalism versus Conservatism 218 Surviving in a Bureaucracy 219 Summary 222 Exercises 222 // CHAPTER 10 Social Work Community Practice 226 // Models of Community Practice 227 Locality-Development Model 227 Social-Planning Model 230 Social-Action Model 230 Generalist-Practice Skills and Macropractice Knowledge for Macropractice 232 Know Your Community 232 Know the Organizations 233 Know Funding Sources and Funding Cycles 236 // Skills for Macropractice—Group Decision-Making Skills 237 ? rainstorming 237 Nominal-Group Technique 238 Needs Assessment 238 PR Skills 241 // Know Your Media 241 Use Media Skillfully 242 Fund-Raising 242 Political Activity and Lobbying 243 // CONTENTS xiii // Community Practice—A ProblemSolving Process 244 Preplanning: Questions to Ask 245 Planning: Plans to Make 245 Impact: Steps to Take 247 // Values and Macropractice 248 A Focus on Assets 250 Summary 250 Exercises 251 // CHAPTER 11 Evaluating Social Work Practice 253 // What Is Evaluation? 253 The Single-System Evaluation Approach 254 Specify the Goal 255 Select Suitable Measures 255 Record Baseline Data 258 Implement the Intervention and Continue Monitoring 259 Assess Change 260 Infer Effectiveness 264 Threats to Validity 264 Single-System Designs 265 T7he Basic AB Design 265 Withdrawal Designs 265 Evaluating Programs 266 // Evaluation in a Managed
Care Environment 267 The Ethics of Evaluation 268 Information Technology in Social Work Practice 268 Assessment and Testing 269 Computerized Clinical Records 269 Practice Management and Billing 270 Managed Care Applications 270 Expert Systems 270 Computer-Based Interventions 270 Graphing Packages 271 Internet and Online Services 271 Summary 272 Exercises 273 // chapter 12 Social Work Practice with Diverse Groups 2 75 // Problems and Barriers 275 // Native American Clients 276 African American Clients 277 Latino Clients 277 Cay and Lesbian Clients 279 Rural Settings 279 Feminist Social Work 280 Other Examples 280 Knowledge You Will Need for Cross-Cultural Work 281 Knowledge of Self 2 81 Knowledge of Differences 281 Applying Your Knowledge: // Techniques of Intervention 284 African American Client-White Worker 285 Latino Client—Non—Latino Worker 286 Nath?# __, ?? .. // Rural Settings 294 Other Differences Affecting Practice Ethnic-Sensitive Practice 295 Some General Observations 296 Macro Strategies to Promote Social and Economic Justice 297 Social Programs 297 Mass Media Appeals 298 Civil Rights Laws 298 Activism 298 School Busing 299 Affirmative Action Programs 300 Minority-Owned Businesses 302 Confrontation of Jokes and // Discriminatory Actions 302 // Grassroots Approaches to Improving // 295 // CHAPTER 13 Spirituality and Religion in Social Work Practice 309 // Spirituality and Religion 309 Rationale for the Use of Spirituality and Religion in Social Work Practice 310 Spiritual
and Religious Assessments of Clients 313 // Spiritual and Religious Interventions with Clients 314 // Social Work and Religion in Limited Partnership 316 Summary 318 Exercises 319 // part 3 // Taking Care of Self // 323 // CHAPTER 14 Surviving and Enjoying Social Work 324 // Students’ Common Concerns 324 Will I Be Able to Make It in Field Placement? 324 // Will I Conduct a Satisfactory Interview with My First Client? 325 // My Supervisor Interviews Much Better Than I— Will I Ever Be Able to Do That Well? 326 How Do I Separate the Roles of Counselor and Friend? 326 // How Do I Avoid Becoming Too Emotionally Involved? 327 // Do I Really Want a Career in Social Work? 328 Safety Guidelines for Social Workers 329 Environmental SignaIs of Danger 329 Client Signals of Danger 329 Worker S igna Is of Danger 330 Assault Cycle 330 Preventing Violence 331 // Safeguards in the Workplace 332 Response Planning 332 Home Visits 333 Burnout 333 // Definitions and Symptoms of Burnout 333 Burnout Is a Reaction to High Stress 334 Structural Causes of Stress That May Lead to Burnout 335 Approaches to Manage Stress and Prevent Burnout 336 Enjoying Social Work and Your Life 338 Become a Positive Thinker 339 Develop an Identity 340 Use Rational Challenges to Develop a Success Identity 341 Summary 346 Exercises 347 // Counseling Theories Resource Manual (CTRM) // 351 // MODULE 1 Psychoanalysis 353 // Sigmund Freud 353 The Mind 353 // Emphasis on the Unconscious 353 The Id, Superego, and Ego 353 Psychosexual
Development 356 Oral Stage 356 Anal Stage 356 Phallic Stage 356 Latency Stage 357 Genital Stage 357 // Psychopathological Development 357 Psychoanalysis 357 Hypnosis 358 Free Association 358 Dream Analysis 358 Transference 359 Evaluation 359 Summary 362 Exercises 362 // MODULE 2 Client-Centered Thercrpy // Central Concepts 364 Theory of Personality Development and Psychopathology 365 Theory of Therapy 366 // 364 // Evaluation 367 Summary 370 Exercise 370 // MODULE 3 Transactional Analysis // Theory of Personality Development 3 71 Personality Structure 371 Psychosocial Drives 3 72 Types of Transactions 3 73 Common Games 374 Life Scripts 375 Theory of Psychopathology 377 // 371 // Theory of Therapy 380 Game Analysis 380 Script Analysis 380 Evaluation 382 Summary 383 Exercises 383 // ? // Module 4 Behavior Therapy // Founders 385 // Types of Learning Processes 385 Operant Conditioning 385 Respondent Conditioning 386 Modeling 387 // 385 // Theory of Psychotherapy 387 Assertiveness Training 388 // Overview of Assertiveness Training 388 Steps in Assertiveness Training 389 Helping Others Become More Assertive 390 // ILII igelity V-JUllLIdL.1111 // Systematic Desensitization 393 In Vivo Desensitization 394 Implosive Therapy 395 Exposure Therapy 396 Covert Sensitization 396 // i nougnt ötopping and Covert Assertion 398 Diversion Techniques 399 Reframing 399 Evaluation 401 Summary 402 Exercises 402 // MODULE 5 Reality Therapy 405 // Theories of Personality Development and Theory of Therapy
408 // Psychopathology 405 Evaluation 414 // Control Theory 405 Summary 415 // Identity Theory 406 Exercises 416 // MODULE 6 Rational Therapy 417 // Theory of Personality Development and Psychopathology 417 Self-Talk Determines Our Feelings and Actions 417 Personality Development and // Self-Concept Formations 418 Additional Aspects of Self-Talk 419 Understanding Deviant Behavior 420 Theory of Therapy 421 // Rational Self-Analysis 421 Therapy Is an Educational Process 422 An Eclectic Approach 422 Common Irrational Beliefs- 423 What Really Causes Change? 423 // What Causes Disturbing Emotions and Ineffective Actions? 423 Restructuring Thinking: Is This the Key Therapeutic Agent ? 423 Nontraditional Psychotherapy Techniques 428 Explaining Mental Illness from a Rational Therapy Perspective 430 What Is Schizophrenia? 430 A Perspective from Rational Therapy 431 A Bizarre Murder 431 Evaluation 432 Summary 434 Exercises 434 // MODULE 7 A Feminist Perspective on Therapy 436 // A History of Sex Roles and Sexism 436 Principles of Feminist Therapy 446 // Contemporary Womens Issues 438 Evaluation 448 // Social Works Response to Womens Issues 443 Summary 451 // The Feminist Perspective 444 Exercises 452 // CONTENTS xvii // MODULE 8 Neuro-Linguistic Programming 454 // NLP Defined 454 Representational Systems 455 Representational System Predicates 455 Eye-Accessing Cues 458 The Four-Tuple 458 Causing Change by Communicating in Metaphor 459 // Reframing 460 // Therapeutic Change Often Occurs
Without Knowing the Cause of the Problem 460 Evaluation 461 Summary 462 Exercises 463 // module 9 Prominent Specifii // Milieu Therapy 464 Psychodrama 465 Play Therapy 466 Parental Education: Parent // Effectiveness Training 466 Parents Are People, Not Gods 467 Who Owns the Problem? 468 PET Techniques 468 Crisis Intervention 471 Task-Centered Practice 473 Solution-Focused Therapy 474 // Treatment Techniques 464 // Mediation 475 Relaxation Approaches 477 // Muscle Relaxation Approaches 411 Deep-Breathing and Imagery Relaxation Approaches 478 Meditation 481 // Hypnosis and Self-Hypnosis 483 Biofeedback 485 Summary 487 Exercises 488 // module 10 Sex Counseling and Therapy 491 // Knowledge 492 Assumptions 492 Words 492 // Levels of Intervention 493 Sex Offender Counseling 495 AIDS 495 // AIDS and the Sexual Revolution 495 Transmission of HIV 498 // Symptoms 499 Testing for AIDS 499 Who Has AIDS? 500 Sexual Problems 501 // Sexual Dysfunctions Defined 501 Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction 507 Summary 508 Exercises 509 // Analysis of Therapy Approaches 511 // Comparison of Counseling Theories 511 // nsig t versus Resolution Approaches 513 Is Counseling Effective? 513 // Summary 518 Exercises 519 // APPENDIX: 520

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