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Bibliografická citace

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(56) Půjčeno:51x 
BK
4. ed.
Belmont : Brooks/Cole, c1999
xxiii,884 s.

objednat
ISBN 0-87581-414-X (váz.)
Obsahuje rejstříky
Bibliografie: s. 845-854
Péče sociální - texty studijní
Práce sociální - texty učební
000096358
Contents // Acknowledgments xv Introduction xvii // part I A Model of the Helping Process і // 1 An Interactional Approach to Helping 2 CHAPTER OUTLINE 2 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE THEORY 2 THE CLIENT-SYSTEM INTERACTION 4 UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS IN THE INTERACTIONAL MODEL 9 // Assumption of Symbiosis 9 Assumption of Obstacles in the Engagement 12 Assumption of Strength for Change 15 THE SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 17 The Roots of the Profession 17 The Function of the Social Work Profession 19 SOCIAL WORK SKILL AND THE WORKING RELATIONSHIP THE INTEGRATION OF PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL SELVES 25 ALTERNATIVE SOCIAL WORK PERSPECTIVES 27 Radical Social Work Practice 27 Feminist Practice 28 Social Work as Psychotherapy 30 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy 30 Summary of Models 33 CHAPTER SUMMARY 34 GLOSSARY 34 // iv Contents // part II Social Work with Individuals 39 // 2 The Preliminary Phase of Work 40 CHAPTER OUTLINE 40 COMMUNICATIONS IN PRACTICE 41 // Obstacles to Direct Communication 41 Examples of Indirect Communication in Practice 42 THE PRELIMINARY PHASE: TUNING IN TO SELF AND TO THE CLIENT 44 // Tuning In to the Authority Theme 44 Elements of the Working Relationship 488 Affective Versus Intellectual Tuning In 50 Tuning In to Your Own Feelings 52 Different Levels of Tuning In 53 RESPONDING DIRECTLY TO INDIRECT CUES 55 OPPRESSION PSYCHOLOGY 61 The Master-Slave Paradigm 62 Indicators of Oppression 63 Alienation and Psychopathology 65 Methods of Defense Against Oppression
66 RESILIENCE THEORY 67 // Developmental Psychology Theory and Research 68 Resilience and Life-Span Theory 71 Implications for Social Work Practice 72 AGENCY RECORDS, REFERRAL REPORTS, AND THE AGENCY CULTURE 73 VALUES, ETHICS, AND THE U\W IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 75 Values and Ethics 76 The Impact of Legislation and the Court 83 CHAPTER SUMMARY 88 GLOSSARY 89 // 3 Beginnings and the Contracting Skills 93 CHAPTER OUTLINE 93 // THE DYNAMICS OF NEW RELATIONSHIPS 94 CONTRACTING IN FIRST SESSIONS 99 Contracting Example 101 Some Variant Elements in Contracting 102 Research Findings on Contracting 104 CONTRACTING OVER TIME 105 CONTRACTING WITH RESISTANT CLIENTS 107 MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT IN THE BEGINNING PHASE 11 7 // Contents // CULTURALLY DIVERSE PRACTICE 1 20 // Mexican-American 122 African-American 122 American Indian 124 // Canadian Indian 125 // Issues in Cross-Racial Practice 126 Education and Training for Culturally Sensitive Practice EVALUATION OF PRACTICE: PROCESS AND OUTCOMES Process Evaluation: The Record of Service 1 29 Outcome Evaluation: The Single-System Research Design CHAPTER SUMMARY 132 GLOSSARY 133 4 Skills in the Work Phase 135 CHAPTER OUTLINE 135 // A MODEL OF THE WORK PHASE INTERVIEW I 36 // Work Phase Summary 136 SESSIONAL TUNING-IN SKILLS 1 38 // Tuning In to the Client’s Sense of Urgency 139 Tuning In to the Worker’s Own Feelings 141 Tuning In to the Meaning of the Client’s Struggle 143 // Tuning In and the Worker’s Realities of Time and Stress Tuning In to
the Worker’s Own Life Experiences 144 SESSIONAL CONTRACTING 145 ELABORATING SKILLS 148 Containment 148 // Moving from the General to the Specific 149 Focused Listening 151 Questioning 151 Reaching Inside of Silences 152 EMPATHIC SKILLS 155 Reaching for Feelings 158 Displaying Understanding of Client’s Feelings 158 Putting the Client’s Feelings into Words 160 Research Findings on Empathy 160 SHARING WORKER’S FEELINGS 161 Issues in Sharing Worker’s Feelings 165 Research on Sharing Feelings 167 MAKING A DEMAND FOR WORK 168 Partializing Client Concerns 171 Holding to Focus 173 Checking for Underlying Ambivalence 174 Challenging the Illusion of Work 175 Pointing Out Obstacles 176 // 127 // 128 // 131 // 144 // vi Contents // Supporting Clients in Taboo Areas 176 Dealing with the Authority Theme 179 IDENTIFYING PROCESS AND CONTENT CONNECTIONS 1 81 SKILLS FOR SHARING DATA 1 85 // Providing Relevant Data 186 // Providing Data in a Way That Is Open to Examination 188 Ethical Dilemmas in Withholding Data 190 HELPING THE CLIENT TO SEE LIFE IN NEW WAYS 191 SESSIONAL ENDING AND TRANSITION SKILLS 1 92 // The Skill of Summarizing і 93 // The Skill of Generalizing 193 // The Skill of Identifying Next Steps 194 The Skill of Rehearsal 195 // The Skill of Identifying “Doorknob" Communications 196 CHAPTER SUMMARY 197 GLOSSARY 197 // 5 Endings and Transitions 200 CHAPTER OUTLINE 200 // THE DYNAMICS AND SKILLS OF ENDINGS 201 The Denial Phase 203 Indirect and Direct Expressions of Anger 205 The
Mourning Period 209 "Trying It on for Size" 211 The "Farewell-Party" Syndrome 212 THE SKILLS OF TRANSITIONS 212 Identification of Major Learnings 213 Identification of Areas for Future Work 215 Synthesizing the Ending Process and Content 217 Transitions to New Experiences and Support Systems 218 SOME VARIATIONS ON THE ENDINGS THEMES 221 Ending a Relationship That Never Really Began 222 Endings Caused by the Termination of the Worker’s Job 224 Endings Caused by the Death of the Client 226 CHAPTER SUMMARY 232 GLOSSARY 232 // part III Social Work with Families 233 // 6 Family Practice in the Social Work Context 234 CHAPTER OUTLINE 234 // SOCIAL WORK WITH FAMILIES 234 // SELECTED CONCEPTS FROM FAMILY THERAPY THEORY 236 // Contents vi і // THE TWO-CLIENTS CONCEPT AND THE WORKER’S ROLE 240 FIRST FAMILY SESSION WITH AN ANGRY FATHER 243 Discussion of the First Family Session 246 FAMILY SUPPORT WORK OVER TIME 247 WORKING WITH A SINGLE-PARENT FAMILY 254 THE IMPACT OF CULTURE AND COMMUNITY: A WHITE WORKER AND AN AMERICAN INDIAN FAMILY 262 PARENT-TEEN CONFLICT IN A PSYCHIATRIC SETTING 269 CHAPTER SUMMARY 274 GLOSSARY 275 // 7 Problem-Centered Family Practice 211 CHAPTER OUTLINE 277 // MANDATE, CLIENT PROBLEM, AND FAMILY COUNSELING 277 HIDING THE FAMILY’S SECRETS: DEALING WITH TABOO AREAS 278 THE CHILD WELFARE SETTING 280 // The Foster Parent 280 Working with the Child in Care 286 A Teen Parent and Her Family of Origin 289 FAMILY PRACTICE IN A SCHOOL SETTING 290 THE SINGLE-PARENT FAMILY
AND THE “BIG BROTHER” // SERVICE 296 The Acting-Out Parent 296 An Ending and Transition 298 CHAPTER SUMMARY 299 GLOSSARY 299 // part IV Social Work with Groups 301 // 8 The Group as a Mutual Aid System 302 CHAPTER OUTLINE 302 // THE DYNAMICS OF MUTUAL AID 303 // Sharing Data 303 // The Dialectical Process 305 // Discussing a Taboo Area 305 // The "AII-in-the-Same-Boat" Phenomenon 306 // Developing a Universal Perspective 307 // Mutual Support 307 // Mutual Demand 307 // Individual Problem-Solving 309 // Rehearsal 310 // viii Contents // The "Strength-in-Numbers" Phenomenon 312 Summary of the Dynamics of Mutual Aid 312 OBSTACLES TO MUTUAL AID 313 THE FUNCTION OF THE CROUP LEADER 314 THE "FEAR-OF-GROUPS” SYNDROME 315 CHAPTER SUMMARY 317 GLOSSARY 317 9 Group Formation 519 CHAPTER OUTLINE 319 PREPARING FOR GROUP WORK 319 WORK WITH THE STAFF SYSTEM 320 Achieving Consensus on the Service 321 Identifying Group Type and Structure 326 Group Versus Individual Work with Clients 327 Agency Support for Groups 328 GROUP COMPOSITION, TIMING, AND STRUCTURE Group Member Selection 330 Group Timing 332 // Group Structure, Setting, and Rules 334 WORK WITH PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS 335 Strategizing for Effective Referrals 336 Worker Skills in the Initial Interviews 337 CHAPTER SUMMARY 340 GLOSSARY 341 // 10 The Beginning Phase with Groups 343 CHAPTER OUTLINE 343 // THE DYNAMICS OF FIRST GROUP SESSIONS 344 THE COUPLES’GROUP 345 // The Initial Stage 346 The Work Continues 356 The Ending and Transition
Stage 362 RECONTRACTING 364 // Recontracting with Your Own Group 365 Joining an Ongoing Group 382 CO-LEADERSHIP IN GROUPS 389 CHAPTER SUMMARY 390 GLOSSARY 391 // 11 First Group Sessions: Some Variations 392 CHAPTER OUTLINE 392 // 329 // FIRST SESSIONS WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS 392 // Contents ix // Foster Adolescents in a Child Welfare Setting 392 Ten-Year-Old Girls in a School Setting 394 Unmarried Pregnant Teens in a Shelter 400 Setting Limits: An Adolescent Acting-Out Boys’ Croup 401 Contracting with 12-Year-Old Boys in a School Setting 405 // THE IMPACT OF AUTHORITY ON THE FIRST SESSION 406 Involuntary Groups: Addiction and Family Violence 406 Parole Group for Ex-Convicts 412 Public Welfare Clients 416 Authority and the Adoption Process 419 CLIENT PROBLEM IMPACT 423 // Parents with Children with Cerebral Palsy 423 Foster Parents: The Late-Arriving Members 423 Outpatient Psychiatric Group: Initial Resistance 424 Women with Recent Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis: // Crying in the First Session 425 IMPACT OF THE SETTING OF SERVICE 427 // Patient Ward Group: Dealing with the Hospital 427 Teen Boys in a Residential Setting: // Empowerment for Change 428 Alternative Public Day School: Parents of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties 429 IMPACT OF TIME 431 CHAPTER SUMMARY 435 GLOSSARY 436 // 1 2 The Work Phase in the Group 437 CHAPTER OUTLINE 437 SESSIONAL CONTRACTING IN THE GROUP 438 // Reaching for Individual Communication in the Group 438 Acting-Out Behavior: Children,
Teens, and Adults 444 Reaching for the Group Response to the Individual 447 Reaching for the Work When Obstacles Threaten 452 THE WORK PHASE IN A GROUP SESSION 455 Helping the Group Work Over Time 456 Focusing the Group on Problem-Solving Mutual Aid 468 SESSIONAL ENDINGS AND TRANSITIONS 470 CHAPTER SUMMARY 472 GLOSSARY 473 1 3 Working with the Individual in the Group 474 CHAPTER OUTLINE 474 // THE CONCEPT OF ROLE IN A DYNAMIC SYSTEM 474 // x // Contents // THE SCAPEGOAT IN THE GROUP 476 // Scapegoating Examples 478 Dealing with the Scapegoating Pattern 495 THE DEVIANT MEMBER 495 // Deviant Behavior as Communication 496 The Deviant as a Functional Role 498 THE INTERNAL LEADER 505 // The Internal Leader—The Worker’s Ally or Enemy 505 THE GATEKEEPER 508 // The Use of Humor as a Form of Flight 509 THE DEFENSIVE MEMBER 514 A Three-Stage Change Process 514 THE QUIET MEMBER 523 THE MONOPOLIZER 526 // Parents of Children with Traumatic Brain Injury 527 Men’s Counseling Group 528 CHAPTER SUMMARY 531 GLOSSARY 532 1 4 Working with the Group as the Second Client 534 CHAPTER OUTLINE 534 THE GROUP AS AN ORGANISM 535 DEVELOPMENTAL TASKS 535 // Dealing with the Relationship to the Worker 537 Dealing with the Relationships Between Members 542 Developing a Culture for Work 556 The Impact of Ethnicity on Group Culture 570 HELPING GROUP MEMBERS DEVELOP A STRUCTURE FOR WORK 580 // Research on Group Structural Variables 580 Young Recovering Addicts: Developing the Rules for the Group 581 Developing
a Group Structure Over Time: // Teen Psychiatric Group 583 HELPING GROUP MEMBERS NEGOTIATE THE ENVIRONMENT 588 Adolescents: Acting-Out Behavior in the Community Center 588 Sixth-Grade Girls and the Transition to a New School 590 CHAPTER SUMMARY 591 GLOSSARY 592 // Contents // 1 5 Endings and Transitions with Groups 595 CHAPTER OUTLINE 595 // ENDING AND TRANSITION PHASE SUMMARY 595 ENDINGS AND TRANSITIONS: GROUP ILLUSTRATIONS 596 // Ending Session with Patients with Multiple Sclerosis 596 Pregnant Teens in a Group Home 598 Children’s Group in an Elementary School 600 Welfare Mothers’ Croup 602 Men’s Support Group 605 Hearing-Impaired Teenagers’ Group 605 Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: The Last Six Sessions 607 A TERMINATION SESSION: THE WORKER LEAVING THE GROUP 614 CHAPTER SUMMARY 618 GLOSSARY 618 1 6 Some Variant Elements in Group Practice 619 CHAPTER OUTLINE 619 THE OPEN-ENDED GROUP 619 // Hospital Group on a Gynecological Ward 620 Bringing in the New Member to an AIDS Group 622 RESIDENTIAL SETTINGS 623 // Housing Complex Group for Elderly Persons 623 THE SINGLE-SESSION CROUP 628 // Information Group: Foster Parent Recruitment 629 An Informal Event Group: Remembering the Holocaust 630 ACTIVITY IN GROUPS 632 // Children Dealing with Their Parents’ Separation and Divorce 634 Teenage Girls’ Dance Group in a Residential Setting 645 Activity Group for Vietnamese Immigrant Women 648 CHAPTER SUMMARY 650 GLOSSARY 650 1 7 Substance Abuse and Group Work Practice 652 CHAPTER
OUTLINE 652 THE LITERATURE ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE 652 GROUP WORK WITH SUBSTANCE ABUSERS 655 Group Work with Active Abusers 655 Group Work with Persons in Recovery 660 // Contents xiii // COMMUNITY ORGANIZING PHILOSOPHY AND MODELS THE NEIGHBORHOOD AS COMMUNITY 766 THE MILIEU AS COMMUNITY 796 // Working with the Milieu as Community: The War Memorial Gazette 796 SUMMARY 802 GLOSSARY 802 // Epilogue 805 // Appendix A: Research Methodology 807 // Appendix B: Codes of Ethics 812 // Bibliography 845 // Index of Case Examples 855 // Name Index 863 // Subject Index 867 // 765 // PART // CROUP WORK WITH CLIENTS WITH A DUAL DIAGNOSIS 672 GROUP WORK WITH THE SUBSTANCE ABUSER’S SIGNIFICANT OTHERS 685 // GROUP WORK AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION 703 // Substance Abuse Prevention 703 CHAPTER SUMMARY 708 GLOSSARY 709 // I Social Work with the System m // 1 8 Helping Clients to Negotiate the System 712 CHAPTER OUTLINE 712 INTRODUCTION 712 // THE INDIVIDUAL-SYSTEM INTERACTION 714 MEDIATING THE INDIVIDUAL-SYSTEM ENGAGEMENT 715 // Work with the School System 717 Work with the Hospital System 723 CONFRONTATION, SOCIAL PRESSURE, AND ADVOCACY 734 Client Advocacy: Helping a Client Negotiate the Housing System 735 CHAPTER SUMMARY 740 GLOSSARY 740 1 9 Professional Impact on the System 742 CHAPTER OUTLINE 742 INTRODUCTION 742 // FROM INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS TO SOCIAL ACTION 744 // Illustrations of Agency Change 745 Social Action in the Community 749 PROFESSIONAL IMPACT AND INTERSTAFF RELATIONSHIPS 751 The Agency
as a Social System 752 Interdisciplinary Work with a Client: // Who Owns the Client? 754 Interdepartmental Communications in a Large System 755 Impact on Relations with Staff at Other Agencies 759 CHAPTER SUMMARY 761 GLOSSARY 762 20 Social Work in the Community 764 CHAPTER OUTLINE 764 NEIGHBORING AND NEIGHBORHOODS 764 // Name // Subjec

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