Úplné zobrazení záznamu

Toto je statický export z katalogu ze dne 19.12.2020. Zobrazit aktuální podobu v katalogu.

Bibliografická citace

.
0 (hodnocen0 x )
(10) Půjčeno:10x 
BK
4th corrected printing
Berlin : Springer, 2006
xvi, 582 s. : il. ; 28 cm

objednat
ISBN 3-540-59186-9 (váz.) ISBN !978-3-540-59186-3 (chyb.)
Bibliografie na s. [525]-565, rejstříky
000128274
A. D. Miai! // The // Geology // of // Fluvial // Deposits // ISBN 3-540-59186-9 // Il I // 9 783540 591863 // Andrew Miall was born in Brighton, England, and was educated there, obtaining a B. Sc. degree at the University of London in 1965. He then emigrated to Canada, and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Ottawa in 1969. // He worked in and around the petroleum industry in Calgary for the next 10 years, including a j-year term as a Research Scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada,- working on regional basin studies in the Canadian Arctic Islands. While in Calgary he conceived and chaired the First International Symposium on Fluvial Sedimentology in 1977, an event that is now held every 4 years. Andrew Miall moved to the University of Toronto in 1979, where he is now Professor of Geology. His research in the areas of fluvial sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy is widely used, and he has held distinguished lectureships or fellowships in Canada, the United States, Britain, Polatid, South Africa, China, Japan and Australia. The second edition of his book "Principles of Sedimentary Basin Analysis" was published by Springer in 1990. He was awarded a D.Sc. degree by the University of London in 1992, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1995. // The Geology of Fluvial Deposits represents the first published synthesis of research on the sedimentary geology of fluvial deposits. It sets out in detail the methods for the field and subsurface study
of these sediments, and provides geologists with detailed de’ lions of the building blocks of fluvial stratigraphic-units, from lithofacies through architectural elements and depositional systems to large-scale stratigraphic sequences and basin-fill complexes. This book also examines at length autogenic sedimentary controls and discusses the tectonic and climatic controls of fluvial sedimentation and the effects of base level change on sequence architecture. The book contains a new classification of oil and gas fields in fluvial reservoirs, with descriptions of selected case examples. Profusely illustrated and with an extensive reference to the recent literature this textbook will be welcomed by the student and professional geologist alike. // h ttp://w ww.sp ri nger.de // Contents // 1 Introduction ... 1 // 1.1 Scope and Purpose of Book... 1 // 1.2 Data Sources ... 2 // 2 Historical Background ... 5 // 2.1 Introduction ... 5 // 2.2 Early Developments in the Study of Fluvial Sediments ... 5 // 2.2.1 From the Ancient Greeks to Playfair... 5 // 2.2.2 From Lyell to Davis ... 8 // 2.3 Growth of Present-Day Concepts, up to 1977 ... 13 // 2.3.1 Increasing Specialization of the Twentieth Century... 13 // 2.3.2 Descriptive Fluvial Geomorphology ... 13 // 2.3.3 Quantitative Fluvial Geomorphology ... 16 // 2.3.4 Sediment Transport and Textural Studies ... 17 // 2.3.5 Bedforms and Paleocurrents... 19 // 2.3.6 Fluvial Facies Models... 22 // 2.3.6.1 From Hobbs to Fisk ... 22 // 2.3.6.2 Meandering
River Deposits: // Development of Modern Facies Model Concepts ... 26 // 2.3.6.3 Braided Rivers... 30 // 2.3.6.4 Alluvial Fans ... 31 // 2.3.6.5 Other Facies Models... 32 // 2.3.7 Fluvial Architecture ... 34 // 2.3.8 Paleohydraulics... 35 // 2.4 Growth of Present-Day Concepts, 1978-1988 ... 37 // 2.4.1 Bedforms and Sedimentary Structures ... 37 // 2.4.2 The Decline and Fall of the Vertical Profile ... 38 // 2.4.3 Fluvial Architecture ... 42 // 2.4.3.1 Architectural Scale and the Bounding-Surface Concept... 42 // 2.4.3.2 Alluvial Basin Architecture... 45 // 2.4.4 Fluvial Styles ... 47 // 2.4.4.1 High-Sinuosity Rivers ... 49 // 2.4.4.2 Low-Sinuosity Rivers... 50 // 2.4.4.3 Anastomosed Rivers... 52 // 2.4.4.4 Ephemeral Rivers ... 54 // 2.4.4.5 Large Rivers... 54 // 2.4.4.6 Floodplain Environments ... 54 // 2.5 Conclusions... 55 // XII // Contents // 3 // 3.1 // 3.2 // 3.3 // 3.4 // 3.5 // Concepts of Scale ... // Time Scales and Physical Scales in Sedimentation ... // The Grouping of Architectural Units in Clastic Rocks // According to Depositional Time Scale ... // Definition of Sediment Groups by Bounding Surfaces... // Sedimentation Rate and Its Relation to Depositional Recurrence Interval Application of Scale Concepts to Basin Analysis and Petroleum Geology // 4 Methods of Architectural-Element Analysis // 4.1 Introduction ... // 4.2 Construction of Outcrop Profiles... // 4.3 Classification of Lithofacies ... // 4.4 Principles of Paleocurrent Analysis... // 4.5 Classification
of Bounding Surfaces ... // 4.6 Classification of Architectural Elements-- // 4.7 Classification of Channels and Larger Bodies // 4.8 Annotation of Outcrop Profiles ... // 4.9 Summary of Methods... // 75 // 75 // 75 // 77 // 78 81 89 // 94 // 95 98 // 5 Lithofacies... // 5.1 Introduction ... // 5.2 Gravel Facies ... // 5.2.1 Depositional Processes in Gravel-Bed Rivers // 5.2.1.1 Introduction ... // 5.2.1.2 Traction Currents, Fluid Flows... // 5.2.1.3 Sediment Gravity Flows... // 5.2.2 Gravel Lithofacies... // 5.3 Sand Facies ... // 5.3.1 Sand Bedform Genesis and Classification .. // 5.3.2 Sand Lithofacies ... // 5.4 Fine-Grained Clastic Facies... // 5.5 Nonclastic Facies ... // 5.6 Associated Facies ... // 99 // 99 // 99 // 99 // 99 // 99 // 105 // 106 109 109 112 123 127 130 // 6 Architectural Elements Formed Within Channels . // 6.1 Introduction ... // 6.2 Channels (Element CH)... // 6.3 Gravel Bars and Bedforms (Element GB) ... // 6.4 Sediment-Gravity-Flow Deposits (Element SG) ... // 6.5 Sandy Bedforms (Element SB) ... // 6.6 Downstream-Accretion Macroforms (Element DA) // 6.7 Lateral-Accretion Deposits (Element LA)... // 6.8 Laminated Sand Sheets (Element LS) ... // 6.9 Hollows (Element HO)... // 131 // 131 // 131 // 139 // 145 // 146 151 155 163 163 // 7 Architectural Elements of the Overbank Environment // 7.1 Introduction ... // 7.2 Levee and Crevasse Deposits... // 7.2.1 Levee Deposits (Element LV) ... // 7.2.2 Crevasse-Channel Deposits (Element CR) ... // 169 // 169
// 172 // 172 // 173 // Contents // XIII // 7.2.3 Crevasse-Splay Deposits (Element CS) ... 174 // 7.3 Fine-Grained Clastic Deposits ... 176 // 7.3.1 Floodplain Fines (Element FF) ... 177 // 7.3.2 Abandoned Channel Fills (Element FF(CH))... 177 // 7.4 Biochemical Sediments ... 178 // 7.4.1 Coal... 179 // 7.4.2 Paleosols... 183 // 7.4.3 Evaporites ... 190 // 8 Fluvial Styles and Facies Models ... 191 // 8.1 Controls on Channel Style... 191 // 8.2 Facies Models ... 198 // 8.2.1 Gravel-Bed Braided River with Sediment-Gravity-Flow Deposits ... 206 // 8.2.2 Shallow, Gravel-Bed Braided River ... 208 // 8.2.3 Deep, Gravel-Bed Braided River... 209 // 8.2.4 Gravel-Bed, Wandering River... 211 // 8.2.5 Gravel-Bed, Meandering River... 212 // 8.2.6 Gravel-Sand Meandering River ... 215 // 8.2.7 Sand-Bed Meandering River... 217 // 8.2.8 Ephemeral, Sand-Bed Meandering River ... 219 // 8.2.9 Fine-Grained Meandering River... 222 // 8.2.10 Anastomosed River ... 229 // 8.2.11 Low-Sinuosity River, with Alternate Bars... 233 // 8.2.12 Shallow, Perennial, Sand-Bed Braided River ... 234 // 8.2.13 Deep, Perennial, Sand-Bed Braided River... 235 // 8.2.14 High-Energy, Sand-Bed Braided River ... 238 // 8.2.15 Distal, Sheetflood, Sand-Bed River ... 240 // 8.2.16 Flashy, Ephemeral, Sheetflood, Sand-Bed River ... 243 // 8.3 Alluvial Fans and Other Fluvial Distributary Systems ... 245 // 9 The Stratigraphic Architecture of Fluvial Depositional Systems... 251 // 9.1 Introduction ... 251 // 9.2 Channel Belts...
251 // 9.3 Depositional Systems... 261 // 9.4 Basin-fill Complexes... 265 // 9.5 Methods of Correlation and Mapping... 272 // 9.5.1 The Use of Marker Beds... 272 // 9.5.2 Wireline Logs ... 273 // 9.5.3 Lithofacies Mapping ... 276 // 9.5.4 Seismic Methods... 283 // 9.5.5 Ground-Penetrating Radar ... 292 // 9.5.6 Magnetostratigraphy ... 293 // 9.5.7 Paleocurrent Analysis ... 293 // 9.5.8 The Dipmeter ... 298 // 9.5.9 Surveillance Geology ... 302 // 9.6 Stratigraphic Nomenclature ... 306 // 10 Fluvial Depositional Systems and Autogenic Sedimentary Controls ... 311 // 10.1 Introduction ... 311 // 10.2 The Evolution of Distributary Fluvial Systems ... 311 // 10.3 Avulsion in Fluvial Systems and Its Effect on Alluvial Stratigraphy. 317 // XIV // Contents // 10.3.1 The Development of Meander Belts... 318 // 10.3.2 Avulsion in Braided Fluvial Systems ... 322 // 10.3.3 Avulsion in Anastomosed Fluvial Systems... 325 // 10.4 Quantitative Studies of Alluvial Architecture ... 327 // 10.4.1 The Dimensions of Fluvial Sand Bodies ... 328 // 10.4.2 Estimating Probabilities of Sand Body Penetration // and Interconnectedness in the Subsurface... 334 // 10.4.3 Alluvial Stratigraphy Models ... 337 // 11 Tectonic Control of Fluvial Sedimentation ... 343 // 11.1 Introduction ... 343 // 11.2 Tectonic Control of Alluvial Stratigraphy... 343 // 11.2.1 The Effects of Syndepositional Fault and Fold Movements... 344 // 11.2.1.1 The Effects of Basin-Margin Faulting ... 344 // 11.2.1.2 The Effects of Faulting
and Folding Within Basins... 348 // 11.2.2 Base-Level Changes ... 352 // 11.3 Tectonic Control of Basin Style and Basin-Scale Fluvial Patterns... 362 // 11.3.1 BigRivers... 362 // 11.3.2 Axial and Transverse Drainage... 364 // 11.3.3 Regional Tectonic Control Revealed by Basin Analysis ... 365 // 11.3.4 Tectonism and Sediment Supply ... 367 // 11.3.5 Intraplate Stress ... 370 // 11.3.6 Quantitative Models of Sediment Supply, Transfer, // and Accumulation ... 372 // 11.4 Plate-Tectonic Setting of Alluvial Basins ... 376 // 11.4.1 Basin Classification ... 376 // 11.4.2 Extensional Basins ... 377 // 11.4.2.1 Rift Basins ... 379 // 11.4.2.2 Continental-margin Basins... 381 // 11.4.2.3 Failed Rifts and Aulacogens ... 382 // 11.4.3 Convergent-margin Basins ... 386 // 11.4.3.1 Forearc Basins... 386 // 11.4.3.2 Backarc Basins... 386 // 11.4.3.3 Retroarc (Foreland) Basins ... 387 // 11.4.4 Basins Formed Along Strike-Slip Faults ... 393 // 11.4.4.1 Basins Associated with Intracontinental Transform Faults... 393 // 11.4.4.2 Basins Associated with Divergent Plate Boundaries ... 394 // 11.4.5 Basins Related to Plate Collision ... 395 // 11.4.5.1 Peripheral Foreland Basins ... 397 // 11.4.5.2 Hinterland Basins... 400 // 11.4.6 Structural and Stratigraphic Patterns Common to Foreland Basins... 402 // 11.4.7 Sedimentary Basins and Allochthonous Terranes... 409 // 11.4.8 Cratonic Basins... 4 2 // 11.5 Basic Paleogeographic Models for Nonmarine Basins ... 412 // 12 what Does Fluvial Lithofacies
Reveal About Climate? ... 421 // 12.1 Introduction ... 421 // 12.2 Climatic Variables ... 422 // 12.3 Distinguishing Tectonic from Climatic Control ... 423 // 12.4 Review of Climatic Criteria... 425 // 12.5 Conglomerates: The Significance of Texture and Petrology ... 425 // Contents // XV // 12.5.1 Mass-flow Versus Traction-current Processes... 425 // 12.5.1.1 Arid Climates ... 428 // 12.5.1.2 Temperate-Humid Climates ... 430 // 12.5.1.3 Tropical-Humid Climates ... 430 // 12.5.1.4 Boreal-Paraglacial Climates ... 431 // 12.5.1.5 Summary and Conclusions ... 431 // 12.5.2 The Influence of Climate on Texture and Composition of Gravels ... 432 // 12.6 Sandstones: The Significance of Sand Body Architecture // and Sedimentary Structures ... 433 // 12.6.1 Fluvial Style in Sand-bed Rivers... 433 // 12.6.2 Sand Body Architecture... 434 // 12.6.3 Bedforms and Cycles ... 436 // 12.7 Overbank Fines: The Significance of Bedding // and Minor Sedimentary Structures ... 437 // 12.8 The Significance of Color ... 439 // 12.9 Associated Clastic, Chemical, and Biochemical Sediments ... 439 // 12.9.1 Coal... 439 // 12.9.2 Paleosols... 440 // 12.9.3 Evaporites ... 441 // 12.9.4 Eolian Interbeds ... 441 // 12.9.5 Palustrine Limestones ... 442 // 12.10 Contrasting Climatic Indicators... 442 // 12.11 The Interrelationship Between Tectonics and Climate... 443 // 12.12 Orbital Forcing ... 444 // 12.12.1 Sedimentary Evidence of Orbital Forcing... 444 // 12.12.2 Fluvial Response to the Late Cenozoic Glaciations
... 447 // 12.12.3 Conclusions... 450 // 12.13 Discussion ... 450 // 13 Sequence Stratigraphy... 453 // 13.1 Introduction ... 453 // 13.2 Accommodation Space ... 456 // 13.3 Main Components of the Fluvial Sequence Model ... 459 // 13.3.1 Sequence Boundary ... 459 // 13.3.2 Lowstand Systems Tract ... 466 // 13.3.3 Transgressive Systems Tract... 471 // 13.3.4 Equivalent of Maximum Flooding Surface... 474 // 13.3.5 Highstand Systems Tract... 474 // 13.3.6 Falling-stage Systems Tract... 475 // 13.4 Time Scales of Nonmarine Sequences and Their Causes ... 475 // 13.4.1 First-order Cycles... 476 // 13.4.2 Second-order Cycles... 476 // 13.4.3 Third-order Cycles ... 477 // 13.4.4 Fourth- and Fifth-order Cycles... 477 // 13.5 Discussion ... 477 // 14 Stratigraphic and Tectonic Controls on the Distribution // and Architecture of Fluvial Oil and Gas Reservoirs ... 479 // 14.1 Introduction ... 479 // 14.2 The Geometry of Fluvial Reservoirs... 480 // 14.2.1 Geometry and Origin of Depositional Systems ... 480 // XVI // Contents // 14.2.1.1 Clastic Wedges ... // 14.2.1.2 Paleovalley Fills... // 14.2.2 Geometry of Reservoir Bodies ... // 14.2.2.1 Sheet Sandstones ... // 14.2.2.2 Sandstone Ribbons and Lenses ... // 14.2.2.3 Stratigraphic Variations in Reservoir Geometry // 14.3 Tectonic Setting of Fluvial Reservoirs... // 14.3.1 Retroarc (Backarc) Foreland Basins ... // 14.3.2 Backarc Basins... // 14.3.3 Forearc Basins... // 14.3.4 Collision-Related Basins ... // 14.3.5 Basins in Continental-Transform
Settings --- // 14.3.6 Rift Basins ... // 14.3.7 Basins on Extensional Continental Margins ... // 14.3.8 Intracratonic Basins... // 14.4 Styles of Fluvial Reservoir... // 14.4.1 Paleovalley Bodies (PV Type)... // 14.4.2 Sheet Bodies (SH Type) ... // 14.4.3 Channel-and-Bar Bodies (CB Type)... // 14.5 Conclusions... // 480 // 482 // 484 // 484 // 484 // 485 // 486 486 486 486 // 486 // 487 487 487 487 // 489 // 490 // 491 // 492 494 // 15 Case Studies of Oil and Gas Fields in Fluvial Reservoirs ... // 15.1 Introduction ... // 15.2 Paleovalley Fields (PV Type)... // 15.2.1 Little Bow Area, Alberta... // 15.2.2 Cut Bank Sandstone, Montana... // 15.2.3 Zenith Field, Colorado... // 15.2.4 South Ceres Field, Oklahoma ... // 15.3 Sheet Reservoirs (SH Type)... // 15.3.1 Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska... // 15.3.2 Messia Field, Libya ... // 15.3.3 Statfjord Field, North Sea ... // 15.4 Channel-and-Bar Reservoirs (CB Type) ... // 15.4.1 Little Creek Field, Mississippi... // 15.4.2 Daqing Field, China ... // 15.4.3 Red Wash Field, Utah... // 495 // 495 // 495 // 495 // 501 // 502 506 506 506 509 511 513 513 515 519 // 16 Future Research Trends // 523 // References // 525 // Author Index // 567 // Subject Index // 575

Zvolte formát: Standardní formát Katalogizační záznam Zkrácený záznam S textovými návěštími S kódy polí MARC