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Bibliografická citace

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0 (hodnocen0 x )
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BK
Fifth edition
Harlow : Pearson, 2015
x, 446 stran : ilustrace (převážně barevné) ; 25 cm + 1 DVD

objednat
ISBN 978-1-4479-8025-4 (brožováno)
ISBN 978-1-4479-8010-0 (DVD)
Always learning
Obsahuje bibliografii na stranách 426-437 a rejstříky
001452979
1 The world of English language teaching // 1.1 Who speaks English? 1 // 1.1.1 Varieties of English // 1.2 Who learns English, and which variety do they learn? 4 // 1.2.1 General English and ESP // 1.2.2 Business English // 1.2.3 Content-based language teaching (CBLT) and CLIL // 1.3 Who teaches English? 9 // 2 Describing the English language // 2.1 What we want to say 14 // 2.1.1 Form and meaning // 2.1.2 Purpose // 2.2 Appropriacy and register 17 // 2.3 Language as text and discourse 18 // 2.3.1 Discourse organisation // 2.3.2 Genre // 2.4 Grammar 21 // 2.4.1 Choosing words for grammar // 2.4.2 Some important grammatical concepts // 2.5 Lexis 25 // 2.5.1 Word meaning // 2.5.2 Extending word use // 2.5.3 Word combinations // 2.6 The sounds of the language 28 // 2.6.1 Pitch // 2.6.2 Intonation // 2.6.3 Individual sounds // 2.6.4 Sounds and spelling // 2.6.5 Stress // 2.7 Speaking and writing 34 // 2.8 Paralinguistics 36 // 2.8.1 Vocal paralinguistic features // 2.8.2 Physical paralinguistic features // 3 Issues in language learning // 3.1 What research offers 41 // 3.1.1 The mind is a computer // 3.1.2 Explicit and implicit knowledge // 3.1.3 Language is forming habits // 3.1.4 Language is communication // 3.1.5 Language is grammar; language is vocabulary // 3.1.6 The role of other languages (translation) // 3.1.7 Learning is about people // 3.2 Making sense of it all 52 // 4 Popular methodology // 4.1 Approach, method, procedure, technique 54 // 4.2 Three and a half methods 55 // 4.3 Communicative language teaching 57 // 4.3.1 Teaching’unplugged’ // 4.4 Task-based learning 60 // 4.5 The lexical approach 62 // 4.6 Four old humanistic methods 64 // 4.7 A procedure (presentation, practice and production) 65 // 4.8 Which method? What approach? 68 // 4.8.1 What teachers do // 4.8.2 Post-method and learning culture // 4.9 Coursebooks and other materials 71 // 4.9.1 For and against coursebook use // 4.9.2 How to use coursebooks //
4.9.3 Using coursebooks more effectively // 4.9.4 Choosing coursebooks // 4.9.5 Designing our own materials // 4.10 Looking forward 77 // 5 Being learners // 5.1 The age factor 80 // 5.1.1 Young learners // 5.1.2 Teenagers // 5.1.3 Adults // Learner differences 86 // 5.2.1 Learner styles Motivation 89 // 5.3.1 Understanding the nature of motivation // 5.3.2 What affects motivation? // 5.3.3 What teachers can do about student motivation // Levels 94 // 5.4.1 From beginner to advanced // 5.4.2 The CEFR levels // 5.4.3 Other frameworks of language proficiency // Learner autonomy 97 // 5.5.1 Learner training/strategy training // 5.5.2 Autonomy tasks // 5.5.3 Open learning, self-access centres and student ’helpers’ // 5.5.4 Provoking student choice // 5.5.5 Outside the classroom // 5.5.6 Homework // 5.5.7 All in the mind // Beingteachers // Qualities of a good teacher 113 // 6.1.1 The magic of rapport // 6.1.2 Inside the classroom // Roles that teachers ‘play’ 116 // 6.2.1 Talking to students // 6.2.2 The teacher as a teaching ’aid’ What teachers do next 120 // 6.3.1 Teachers on their own // 6.3.2 Teachers with others // 6.3.3 Different ways of observing and being observed // 6.3.4 The big wide world // Class size and different abilities // Class size: two extremes 136 // 7.1.1 Large classes // 7.1.2 Teaching one-to-one Managing mixed ability 143 // 7.2.1 Working with different content // 7.2.2 Different student actions // 7.2.3 What the teacher does // 7.2.4 Special educational needs (SENs) // 7.2.5 Realistic mixed-ability teaching // 8 Feedback, mistakes and correction // 8.1 Giving supportive feedback 154 // 8.2 Students make mistakes 155 // 8.3 Correction decisions 156 // 8.3.1 What to correct // 8.3.2 When to correct // 8.3.3 Who corrects and who should be corrected? // 8.3.4 What to do about correction // 8.4 Correcting spoken English 158 // 8.4.1 Online (on-the-spot) correction // 8.4.2 Offline (after-the-event) correction //
8.5 Giving feedback for writing 161 // 8.5.1 Giving feedback in process writing // 8.5.2 Using correction symbols // 8.5.3 Alternatives to correction symbols // 8.5.4 Letting the students in // 8.5.5 What happens next // 8.5.6 Burning the midnight oil // 9 Managing for success // 9.1 Why problems occur 168 // 9.2 Creating successful classrooms 170 // 9.2.1 Behaviour norms // 9.2.2 Teaching for success // 9.3 Dealing with problems 173 // 10 Seating and grouping students // 10.1 Whole-class teaching 177 // 10.1.1 Seating whole-group classes // 10.2 Students on their own 180 // 10.3 Pairs and groups 181 // 10.3.1 Pairwork // 10.3.2 Groupwork // 10.3.3 Ringing the changes // 10.4 Organising pairwork and groupwork 183 // 10.4.1 Making it work // 10.4.2 Creating pairs and groups // 10.4.3 Procedures for pairwork and groupwork // 10.4.4 Troubleshooting // 11 Technology for learning // 11.1 What is on offer? 192 // 11.1.1 Internet connectivity // 11.2 Technology issues 196 // 11.2.1 Digital divides // 11.2.2 Digital literacy // 11.2.3 Who does what? // 11.2.4 Six questions // 11.3 Using classroom resources 201 // 11.4 Blended learning, flipped classrooms and beyond 204 // 11.4.1 Blended learning // 11.4.2 The flipped classroom // 11.4.3 SOLEs // 11.5 Learning online 206 // 12 Planning // 12.1 Planning paradoxes 210 // 12.2 Thinking about lessons 211 // 12.3 Designing lessons 214 // 12.4 Making a formal plan 216 // 12.4.1 Background elements // 12.4.2 Describing procedure and materials // 12.5 Planning a sequence of lessons 221 // 12.5.1 Projects and threads // 12.6 Planning CUL lessons 225 // 13 Teaching language construction // 13.1 Studying structure and use 228 // 13.1.1 Language study in lesson sequences // 13.1.2 Choosing study activities // 13.1.3 Known or unknown language // 13.2 Explain and practise 231 // 13.2.1 Explaining things // 13.2.2 Practice (accurate reproduction) // 13.3 Meet, need and practise 235 //
13.4 Discover and practise 235 // 13.5 Research and practise 237 // 13.6 Review and recycle 238 // 14 Teaching grammar // 14.1 Introducing grammar 239 // 14.2 Discovering grammar 246 // 14.3 Practising grammar 248 // 14.4 Grammar games 253 // 15 Teaching vocabulary // 15.1 Introducing vocabulary 258 // 15.2 Practising vocabulary 264 // 15.3 Vocabulary games 269 // 15.4 Using dictionaries 271 // 15.4.1 When students use dictionaries // 15.4.2 Dictionary activities // 15.5 Keeping vocabulary notebooks and cards 275 // 16 Teaching pronunciation // 16.1 What is good pronunciation? 277 // 16.2 Pronunciation problems 278 // 16.3 Phonemic symbols: to use or not to use? 280 // 16.4 When to teach pronunciation 281 // 16.5 Pronunciation and the individual student 282 // 16.6 Pronunciation sequences 283 // 16.6.1 Working with sounds // 16.6.2 Working with stress // 16.6.3 Working with intonation and stress // 16.6.4 Sounds and spelling // 16.6.5 Connected speech and fluency // IP Teaching language skills // 17.1 Skills together 297 // 17.1.1 Input and output // 17.1.2 Integrating skills // 17.1.3 Language skills, language construction // 17.1.4 Integrating skill and language work // 17.1.5 Top-down and bottom-up // 17.2 Receptive skills 302 // 17.2.1 A procedure for teaching receptive skills // 17.2.2 The language issue // 17.2.3 Comprehension tasks // 17.3 Productive skills 307 // 17.3.1 A procedure for teaching productive skills // 17.3.2 Structuring discourse // 17.3.3 Interacting with an audience // 17.3.4 Dealing with difficulty // 17.3.5 What to do about language // 17.4 Projects 311 // 17.4.1 Managing projects //
18 Reading // 18.1 Intensive reading 314 // 18.1.1 The vocabulary question // 18.1.2 Analytical reading (text mining) // 18.2 Reading aloud 318 // 18.3 Extensive reading 319 // 18.4 Reading sequences 321 // 19 Listening // 19.1 Skills and strategies 336 // 19.1.1 Top-down listening // 19.1.2 Bottom-up listening // 19.2 Extensive listening 339 // 19.3 Live listening/recorded listening 340 // 19.3.1 Live listening // 19.3.2 Pre-recorded audio // 19.4 Using film and video 343 // 19.4.1 Viewing and listening techniques // 19.5 Listening (and film) sequences 345 // 19.6 The sound of music 357 // 20 Writing // 20.1 Literacies 360 // 20.1.1 Handwriting // 20.1.2 Spelling // 20.1.3 Layout and punctuation // 20.1.4 Text construction // 20.2 Approaches to student writing 363 // 20.2.1 Process and product // 20.2.2 Genre // 20.3 Creative writing 366 // 20.4 Writing as a collaborative activity 367 // 20.5 Building the writing habit 367 // 20.6 Writing-for-learning, writing-for-writing 369 // 20.7 The roles of the teacher 369 // 20.8 Writing sequences 370 // 20.9 Dictation activities 379 // 20.10 Portfolios and journals 381 // 21 Speaking // 21.1 Spoken language 384 // 21.2 Students and speaking 385 // 21.2.1 Reluctant students // 21.3 Speaking repetition 387 // 21.4 Speaking activity types 388 // 21.4.1 Acting from scripts // 21.4.2 Communication games // 21.4.3 Discussion // 21.4.4 Prepared talks and presentations // 21.4.5 Questionnaires // 21.4.6 Simulation and role-play // 21.4.7 Storytelling //
21.5 Speaking sequences 393 // 21.6 Making recordings 404 // 21.6.1 Getting everyone involved // 22 Testing and evaluation // 22.1 Summative and formative assessment 408 // 22.2 Qualities of a good test 409 // 22.2.1 Washback // 22.3 Types of test 410 // 22.4 Test item types 412 // 22.4.1 Some typical test item types // 22.4.2 Skill-focused tests // 22.4.3 Young learner test item types // 22.5 Writing and marking tests 417 // 22.5.1 Writing tests // 22.5.2 Marking tests // 22.6 Teaching for tests 421

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