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EB
EB
ONLINE
Third edition
Boca Raton, FL : CRC Press, [2018]
1 online zdroj
Externí odkaz    Plný text PDF 
   * Návod pro vzdálený přístup 


ISBN 9781315373119 (e-kniha : PDF)
ISBN 9781466587533 (print)
A Complete Reference Covering the Latest Technology in Metal Cutting Tools, Processes, and Equipment Metal Cutting Theory and Practice, Third Edition shapes the future of material removal in new and lasting ways. Centered on metallic work materials and traditional chip-forming cutting methods, the book provides a physical understanding of conventional and high-speed machining processes applied to metallic work pieces, and serves as a basis for effective process design and troubleshooting. This latest edition of a well-known reference highlights recent developments, covers the latest research results, and reflects current areas of emphasis in industrial practice. Based on the authors extensive automotive production experience, it covers several structural changes, and includes an extensive review of computer aided engineering (CAE) methods for process analysis and design.-.
001478351
Contents // Preface to the Third Edition xv // Preface to the Second Edition xvii // Preface to the First Edition xŁL // Authors xxi // Chapter 1 Introduction I // 1.1 Scope of the Subject 1 // 1.2 Historical Development I // 1.2.1 Ancient and Medieval Predecessors 1 // 1.2.2 Canon Boring 4 // 1.2.3 The Industrial Revolution and the Steam Engine 7 // 1.2.4 Nineteenth-Century Quantity Production Industries 10 // 1.2.5 Early Scientific Studies 15 // 1.2.6 Twentieth-Century Mass Production 17 // 1.2.7 Numerical Control 20 // References 22 // Chapter 2 Metal-Cutting Operations 27 // 2.1 Introduction 27 // 2.2 Turning 27 // 2.2.1 Hard Turning ,29 // 2.3 Boring , 30 // 2.4 Drilling 31 // 2.4.1 Deep-Hole Drilling 34 // 2.4.2 Microdrilling 37 // 2.5 Reaming 37 // 2.6 Milling 37 // 2.7 Planing and Shaping 44 // 2.8 Broaching 45 // 2.9 Tapping and Threading 46 // 2.10 Grinding and Related Abrasive Processes 56 // 2.11 Roller Burnishing 64 // 2.12 Deburring 65 // 2.13 Examples 66 // 2.14 Problems 78 // References 80— // Chapter 3 Machine Tools 83 // 3.1 Introduction 83 // 3.2 Production Machine Tools 83 // 3.3 CNC Machine Tools and CNC-Based Manufacturing Systems 88 // 3.3.1 General 88 // 3.3.2 Types of CNC Machines 89 // 3.3.3 CNC-Based Manufacturing Systems 99 // v // Contents // 3.4 Machine Tool Structures 108 // 3.5 Slides and Guideways 119 // 3.6 Axis Drives 122 // 3.7 Spindles 127 // 3.8 Coolant Systems 141 // 3.9 Tool Changing Systems 142 // 3.10 Pallets 145 // 3.11 Energy Use in CNC-Machining Centers 146 // 3.12 Examples 147 // References 150 // hapter 4 Cutting Tools 159 // 4.1 Introduction 159 // 4.2 Cutting-Tool Materials 159 // 4.2.1 Introduction 159 // 4.2.2 Material Properties 159 // 4.2.2.1 High-Speed Steel (HSS) and Related Materials 163 // 4.2.2.2 Sintered Tungsten Carbide (WC) 164 // 4.2.2.3 Cermets 166 // 4.2.2.4 Ceramics 167 //
4.2.2.5 Polycrystalline Tools 169 // 4.2.2.6 Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) 170 // 4.2.2.7 Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) 171 // 4.3 Tool Coatings 172 // 4.3.1 Coating Methods 172 // 4.3.2 Conventional Coating Materials 174 // 4.3.3 Diamond and CBN Coatings 177 // 4.4 Basic Types of Cutting Tools 178 // 4.5 Turning Tools 179 // 4.5.1 Indexable Inserts 179 // 4.5.2 Groove Geometry (Chip Breaker) 183 // 4.5.3 Edge Preparations 183 // 4.5.4 Wiper Geometry 185 // 4.5.5 Insert Clamping Methods 185 // 4.5.6 Tool Angles 186 // 4.5.7 Thread Turning Tools 187 // 4.5.8 Grooving and Cutoff Tools 188 // 4.5.9 Form Tools 189 // 4.6 Boring Tools 190 // 4.6.1 Single Point Boring Tools 190 // 4.6.2 Multipoint Boring Tools 196 // 4.7 Milling Tools 196 // 4.7.1 Types of Milling Cutters 197 // 4.7.2 Cutter Design 200 // 4.7.3 Milling Inserts and Edge Clamping Methods 208 // 4.8 Drilling Tools 209 // 4.8.1 Twist Drill Structural Properties 211 // 4.8.2 Twist Drill Point Geometries 214 // 4.8.3 Spade and Indexable Drills 223 // 4.8.4 Subland and Step Drills 227 // 4.8.5 Multi-Tip (Deep Hole) Drills 228 // 4.8.6 Other Types of Drills 233 // 4.8.7 Chip Removal 234 // 4.8.8 Drill Life and Accuracy 237 // 4.8.9 Hole Deburring Tools 239 // 4.9 Reamers 242 // 4.9.1 Types of Reamers 243 // 4.9.2 Reamer Geometry 244 // 4.10 Threading Tools 246 // 4.10.1 Taps 246 // 4.10.2 Thread Mills 253 // 4.11 Grinding Wheels 255 // 4.11.1 Abrasives 255 // 4.11.2 Bonds 257 // 4.11.3 Wheel Grades and Grit Sizes 257 // 4.11.4 Operational Factors 259 // 4.12 Microsizing and Honing Tools 260 // 4.13 Burnishing Tools 263 // 4.14 Examples 263 // 4.15 Problems 274 // References 275 // Chapter 5 Toolholders and Workholders 281 // 5.1 Introduction 281 // 5.2 Toolholding Systems 281 // 5.2.1 General 281 // 5.2.2 Modular and Quick-Change Toolholding Systems 284 // 5.3 Toolholder/Spindle Connections 290 //
5.3.1 General 290 // 5.3.2 Conventional Tapered "CAT-V" Connection 295 // 5.3.3 Face-Contact CAT-V Interfaces 303 // 5.3.4 HSK Interface 309 // 5.3.5 Proprietary Interfaces 314 // 5.3.6 Quick-Change Interfaces (Toolholders/Adapters) 316 // 5.3.7 Toolholders for Turning Machines 322 // 5.3.8 Evaluation and Comparison of Toolholder/Spindle Interface 323 // 5.4 Cutting Tool Clamping Systems 328 // 5.4.1 Milling Cutter Drives 328 // 5.4.2 Side-Lock-Type Chucks 330 // 5.4.3 Collet Chucks 331 // 5.4.4 Hydraulic Chucks 336 // 5.4.5 Milling Chucks 338 // 5.4.6 Shrink-Fit Chucks 339 // 5.4.7 Proprietary Chucks 341 // 5.4.8 Tapping Attachments 344 // 5.4.9 Reaming Attachments 345 // 5.4.10 Comparison of Cutting Tool Clamping Systems 345 // 5.5 Balancing Requirements for Toolholders 358 // viii Contents // 5.6 Fixtures 362 // 5.6.1 General 362 // 5.6.2 Types of Fixtures 364 // 5.6.3 Fixture Analysis 370 // 5.7 Examples 373 // 5.8 Problems 387 // References 387 // Chapter 6 Mechanics of Cutting 393 // 6.1 Introduction 393 // 6.2 Measurement of Cutting Forces and Chip Thickness 393 // 6.3 Force Components 395 // 6.4 Empirical Force Models 401 // 6.5 Specific Cutting Power 402 // 6.6 Chip Formation and Primary Plastic Deformation 404 // 6.7 Tool-Chip Friction and Secondary Deformation 412 // 6.8 Shear Plane and Slip-Line Theories for Continuous Chip Formation..416 // 6.9 Shear Plane Models for Oblique Cutting 420 // 6.10 Shear Zone Models 422 // 6.11 Minimum Work and Uniqueness Assumptions 425 // 6.12 Finite Element Models 426 // 6.13 Discontinuous Chip Formation 431 // 6.14 Built-Up Edge Formation 434 // 6.15 Examples 436 // 6.16 Problems 438 // References 439 // Chapter 7 Cutting Temperatures 449 // 7.1 Introduction 449 // 7.2 Measurement of Cutting Temperatures 449 // 7.2.1 Tool-Work Thermocouple Method and Related Techniques 449 // 7.2.2 Conventional Thermocouple Methods 453 //
7.2.3 Metallurgical Methods 454 // 7.2.4 Infrared Methods 454 // 7.2.5 Other Methods 456 // 7.3 Factors Affecting Cutting Temperatures 456 // 7.4 Analytical Models for Steady-State Temperatures 457 // 7.5 Finite Element and Other Numerical Models 463 // 7.6 Temperatures in Interrupted Cutting 467 // 7.7 Temperatures in Drilling 469 // 7.8 Thermal Expansion 471 // 7.9 Examples 472 // 7.10 Problem 476 // References 476 // Chapter 8 Machining Process Analysis 483 // 8.1 I ntroduction 483 // 8.2 Turning 484 // 8.3 Boring 486 // Contents ix // 8.4 Milling 487 // 8.4.1 Face Milling 489 // 8.4.2 End Milling 490 // 8.4.3 Ball End Milling 494 // 8.5 Drilling 494 // 8.6 Force Equations and Baseline Data 502 // 8.7 Process Simulation Application Examples 507 // 8.8 Finite Element Analysis for Clamping, Fixturing, and Workpiece // Distortion Applications 512 // 8.9 Finite Element Application Examples 514 // 8.10 Examples 519 // 8.11 Problems 524 // References 525 // Chapter 9 Tool Wear and Tool Life 529 // 9.1 Introduction 529 // 9.2 Types of Tool Wear 530 // 9.3 Measurement of Tool Wear 537 // 9.4 Tool Wear Mechanisms 538 // 9.5 Tool Wear: Material Considerations 541 // 9.6 Tool Life Testing 548 // 9.7 Tool Life Equations 549 // 9.8 Prediction of Tool Wear Rates 551 // 9.9 Tool Fracture and Edge Chipping 554 // 9.10 Drill Wear and Breakage 556 // 9.11 Thermal Cracking and Tool Fracture in Milling 560 // 9.12 Tool Wear Monitoring 561 // 9.13 Examples 562 // 9.14 Problems 568 // References 569 // Chapter 10 Surface Finish, Integrity, and Flatness 575 // 10.1 Introduction 575 // 10.2 Measurement of Surface Finish 576 // 10.2.1 Stylus Measurements 576 // 10.2.2 Other Methods 581 // 10.3 Surface Finish in Turning and Boring 582 // 10.4 Surface Finish in Milling 586 // 10.5 Surface Finish in Drilling and Reaming 590 // 10.6 Surface Finish in Grinding 590 //
10.7 Residual Stresses in Machined Surfaces 592 // 10.8 White Layer Formation 594 // 10.9 Surface Burning in Grinding 595 // 10.10 Measurement of Surface Flatness 597 // 10.11 Surface Flatness Compensation in Face Milling 599 // 10.11.1 Tool Path Direction Compensation 600 // 10.11.2 Depth of Cut Compensation 603 // 10.11.3 Tool Feed Compensation 605 // X \_ll ItC-l ?? // 10.11.4 Spindle-Parl Tilt Compensation 606 // 10.11.5 Surface Flatness Compensation Methods Characteristics 608 // 10.12 Examples 609 // 10.13 Problems 618 // References 618 // Chapter 11 Machinability of Materials 623 // 11.1 Introduction 623 // 11.2 Machinability Criteria, Tests, and Indices 623 // 11.3 Chip Control 627 // 11.4 Burr Formation and Control 633 // 11.5 Machinability of Engineering Materials 638 // 11.5.1 Magnesium Alloys 638 // 11.5.2 Aluminum Alloys 640 // 11.5.3 Metal Matrix Composites 642 // 11.5.4 Copper Alloys 643 // 11.5.5 Cast Iron 644 // 11.5.6 Carbon and Low Alloy Steels 647 // 11.5.7 Stainless Steels 650 // 11.5.8 Powder Metal (P/M) Materials 652 // 11.5.9 Titanium Alloys 653 // 11.5.10 Nickel Alloys 654 // 11.5.11 Depleted Uranium Alloys 656 // References 657 // Chapter 12 Machining Dynamics 665 // 12.1 Introduction 665 // 12.2 Vibration Analysis Methods 665 // 12.3 Vibration of Discrete (Lumped Mass) Systems 666 // 12.3.1 Single Degree-of-Frcedom (SDOF) Systems 668 // 12.3.2 Multiple Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF) Systems 673 // 12.4 Types of Machine Tool Vibration 678 // 12.5 Forced Vibration 680 // 12.6 Self-Excited Vibrations (Chatter) 683 // 12.6.1 Regenerative Chatter, Prediction of Stability Charts (Lobes).684 // 12.6.2 Tlustý’s Theory 687 // 12.6.3 Shear Plane Method 694 // 12.6.4 Other Methods 695 // 12.6.5 Nonregeneralive Chatter, Mode Coupl i ng 698 // 12.7 Chatter Prediction 700 // 12.7.1 Experimental Machine Tool Vibration Analysis 701 //
12.7.2 Measurement of Transfer Functions 702 // 12.8 Vibration Control 706 // 12.8.1 Stiffness Improvement 706 // 12.8.2 Isolation 707 // 12.8.3 Damping and Dynamic Absorption 707 // 12.8.4 Tool Design 709 // 12.8.5 Variation of Process Parameters 709 // 12.9 Active Vibration Control 710 // 12.10 Examples 716 // 12.11 Problems 739 // References 743 // Chapter 13 Machining Economics and Optimization 751 // 13.1 Introduction 751 // 13.2 Role of a Computerized Optimization System 753 // 13.3 Economic Considerations 755 // 13.4 Optimization of Machining Systems: Basic Factors 756 // 13.5 Optimization of Machining Conditions 757 // 13.6 Formulation of the Optimization Problem 758 // 13.6.1 Formulation of Objective Function 758 // 13.6.2 Constraints 761 // 13.6.3 Problem Statement 763 // 13.7 Optimization Techniques 764 // 13.7.1 Single-Pass Operation 764 // 13.7.2 Multipass Operation 764 // 13.7.3 Single-Station Multifunctional System (SSMS) 765 // 13.7.4 Multistage Machining System 765 // 13.7.5 Cutting Tool Replacement Strategies 766 // 13.7.6 Cutting Tool Strategies for Multifunctional Part // Configurations 767 // 13.8 Examples 768 // 13.9 Problems 776 // References 777 // Chapter 14 Cutting Fluids 783 // 14.1 I ntroduction 783 // 14.2 Types of Cutting Fluids 784 // 14.2.1 Neat Oils 784 // 14.2.2 Water-Based Fluids 784 // 14.2.3 Gaseous Fluids 786 // 14.2.4 Air-Oil Mists (Aerosols) 787 // 14.2.5 Cryogenic Fluids 788 // 14.3 Coolant Application 788 // 14.4 Filtering 789 // 14.5 Condition Monitoring and Waste Treatment 794 // 14.6 Health and Safety Concerns 795 // 14.6.1 Toxicity 796 // 14.6.2 Dermatitis 796 // 14.6.3 Respiratory Disorders 796 // 14.6.4 Microbial Infections 796 // 14.6.5 Cancer 797 // 14.7 Dry and Near-Dry Machining Methods 797 // 14.8 Test Procedure for Cutting Fluid Evaluation 798 // References 798 //
Chapter 15 Minimum Quantity Lubrication 803 // 15.1 Introduction 803 // 15.2 MQL System Types 803 // 15.2.1 External and Internal Mist Delivery 804 // 15.2.2 One- and Two-Channel MQL Systems 805 // 15.3 MQL Oils 809 // 15.4 Machine Tools for MQL 810 // 15.5 MQL Cutting Tools 812 // 15.6 Thermal Management and Dimensional Control 817 // 15.7 Air and Chip Handling 818 // 15.8 MQL Research Areas 819 // 15.8.1 Hard Alloy Machining and Grinding 819 // 15.8.2 Alternative Carrying Gases and Cooling Strategies 820 // 15.8.3 MQL Process Modeling 820 // 15.8.4 Oil Additives and Ionic Fluids 821 // References 822 // Chapter 16 Accuracy and Error Compensation of CNC Machining Systems 827 // 16.1 Introduction 827 // 16.2 Machine Tool Errors 828 // 16.3 Machine Tool Accuracy Characterization 837 // 16.4 Machine Tool Performance Evaluation 839 // 16.5 Method for Compensating the Dimensional Accuracy of CNC // Machining System 865 // 16.5.1 Error Reduction and Compensation Strategies 865 // 16.5.2 Error Modeling Methods 872 // 16.5.3 Error Compensation Offset Methods 877 // 16.6 Examples 882 // References 889 // Chapter 17 Gear Machining 897 // 17.1 Introduction 897 // 17.2 Gear Types and Geometry 897 // 17.2.1 Gear Types 897 // 17.2.2 Gear Geometry and Accuracy Classes 898 // 17.3 Tooth Machining Methods for Parallel Axis Gears 900 // 17.3.1 Broaching 901 // 17.3.2 Form Milling 904 // 17.3.3 Hobbing 905 // 17.3.4 Shaping 907 // 17.3.5 Form Grinding from the Solid 909 // 17.4 Bevel and Hypoid Gear Machining 909 // 17.4.1 Peripheral Milling 910 //
17.4.2 Face Milling 912 // 17.4.3 Face Hobbing 913 // 17.5 Five-Axis Machining of Gears 914 // 17.5.1 Parallel Axis Gears 915 // 17.5.2 Bevel Gears 916 // Contents xiii // 17.6 Gear Tooth Finishing Methods 917 // 17.6.1 Shaving 917 // 17.6.2 Skiving (Hard Finishing) 919 // 17.6.2.1 Skiving: Hard Recutting Processes 919 // 17.6.2.2 Skiving: Other Processes 920 // 17.6.3 Grinding 920 // 17.6.3.1 Form Grinding 921 // 17.6.3.2 Indexing Generating Grinding 922 // 17.6.3.3 Continuous Generating Grinding 923 // 17.6.4 Honing 924 // 17.6.5 Lapping 925 // References 926 // Index 933
(OCoLC)945751138

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