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Bibliografická citace

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BK
Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union, 2019
213 stran : barevné ilustrace, mapy ; 30 cm

objednat
ISBN 978-92-9492-975-4 (brožováno)
Education and training
Eurydice report
Nad názvem: European Commission
na rubu titulní strany: Education, Audiovisual & Culture Executive Agency
Terminologický slovník
Obsahuje bibliografii na stranách 137-143
001480571
CONTENTS // Table of Figures 5 // Codes and Abbreviations 7 // Executive Summary 9 // Introduction 23 // Chapter A - Governance 29 // More than 30 million children in the EU are in the ECEC age range 29 // Centre-based ECEC provision is provided either in unitary settings or in separate settings with a transition at age 3 30 // Regulated home-based provision is widespread in only a few European countries 33 // In most countries, the ministry of education is responsible for centre-based ECEC provision // for children aged 3 and over 34 // Top-level authorities seldom recommend measures to ease the transition between childcare- and // education-type settings 37 // Parent representatives usually have a say on the rules governing daily life in ECEC settings 39 // Private self-financing ECEC settings exist in three quarters of European countries 41 // Chapter ? - Access 43 // Section I - Structures 43 // Ensuring universal access: a place is guaranteed from an early age in only a few countries 44 // Most countries guarantee 20-29 hours of ECEC 48 // Most countries have a childcare gap 51 // ECEC is offered free of charge mainly for older children 54 // ECEC fees for children under 3 years are lowest in Baltic and Balkan countries 57 // Targeted measures to facilitate ECEC access focus on children living in poverty 59 // Demand for ECEC places is higher than supply 62 // Section II - Participation 65 // 34 % of children under age 3 attend centre-based ECEC 65 // 95 per cent of children
aged 4 and over attend ECEC: the EU benchmark has been achieved 66 // Children spend 30 hours or more per week in ECEC 68 // Chapter C - Staff 71 // Section I - Qualifications and Continuing Education 71 // Qualification requirements for core practitioners are usually lower for working with younger children than older ones 72 // In the majority of education systems assistants may be employed without an initial qualification in ECEC 74 // Heads of ECEC settings are usually qualified at Bachelor’s level or higher 75 // In one third of European countries, heads of settings for older children must have specific training and previous professional experience 77 // Childminders in regulated home-base provision must have some form of training in most countries 79 // An induction phase is compulsory for all ECEC staff in only seven education systems 81 // Only five education systems have made CPD mandatory for all staff 83 // Section II - Child/Staff Ratios 87 // The maximum number of children per staff member more than doubles between the ages of 2 and 4 87 // Chilminders in regulated home-based provision usually look after a maximum of four or five children under age 3 90 // 3 // Key Data on Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe - 2019 // Chapter D - Educational Guidelines 93 // Section I - General Framework 93 // A third of education systems do not provide educational guidelines for under-3s 94 // ECEC settings must draw up their own pedagogical plan in a majority of countries
97 // Similar core areas exist across Europe for the learning and development of children in ECEC 98 // Balanced pedagogical approaches in ECEC 100 // Observation is the key method for assessing children in ECEC 102 // Section II - Transitions 105 // Age is the main criteria for admission to primary school 105 // Parents have a decision-making role in deferring admission to primary education in half of the education systems 106 // The same educational framework covers both ECEC and higher levels of education in nine countries 108 // In the majority of education systems, some children undertake the last year of ECEC on the same site as the // primary school 109 // A variety of measures is used to ensure a smooth transition between ECEC and primary education 111 // Section III - Support Measures 113 // The most common form of language support in ECEC is speech therapy 113 // A minority of countries provide teaching in home languages in ECEC 115 // Only a quarter of European countries offer home learning guidance 117 // Chapter E - Evaluation and Monitoring 121 // Supporting children’s learning is often a focus for the external evaluation of settings for older children 121 // A third of European education systems have no regulations on the internal evaluation of ECEC settings for children // under 3 126 // Children rarely participate in setting evaluation 129 // A majority of countries monitor the wider ECEC system on the basis of findings at setting level 133 // References 137
Glossary 143 // Annexes 149 // Annex A: Additional data to Figures 149 // Annex B: Authorities responsible for governing ECEC provision 156 // Annex C: Top-level educational guidelines for ECEC provision 160 // National System Information Sheets 163 // Acknowledgements 209 // 4

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